We’ve all heard about going to remote camps in Labrador or Quebec for large brook trout, but less well known are the drive-in rivers of Ontario. Ontario has some amazing wilderness fishing for large brook trout that can be accessed without a floatplane, and Mark Melnyk, co-host of the TV show The New Fly Fisher, has explored many of them in the course of scouting locations for his show. The fantastic part of the story is that he hardly ever needs to resort to a subsurface fly and most of the action is on the surface with mice and other floating imitations. Listen in to Mark’s tips on where to go and how to catch these trophy fish on a budget.

In the Fly Box this week, we have some interesting questions and also some great tips from listeners. (If these tips get any better, I’ll be out of a job!)

  • I only have a 7½ foot rod, and it’s a bit short for working larger rivers.  Can I use my 9 foot 8-weight for trout?
  • Is tungsten toxic?
  • A great tip on how to keep split shot from sliding on the leader
  • A great tip for keeping Thing-A-Ma-Bobbers from sliding on your leader
  • Can I fish the same big dry flies I use on the headwaters of a creek further down in the watershed?
  • Where can my friend go to get help with his tailing loop?
  • Are knotted leaders better than knotless leaders? 
  • Is it better to use a nail knot on my line instead of a loop-to-loop connection?
  • How do I keep some old treasured wet flies from degrading?
  • Are tactical barbless hooks better than just mashing the barb on a standard hook?
  • Is it more effective to use a hackled dry fly or a Comparadun-type during a mayfly hatch?
  • A great tip from a listener in Ireland on a method of fishing Soft Hackles called the “escalator method.”

If you don’t see the “Play” button above, click here to listen.

Mark Melnyk with a glorious Ontario brook trout.



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